Law and Enforcement
in Park W

An increase in elephant poaching, bushmeat poaching, agricultural pressure along the park periphery, increasing livestock numbers, illegal logging, and intensification of illegal fishing are all factors that threaten the long-term conservation of the area which will be addressed by overhauling law enforcement.




 THE MAIN THREATS TO PARK W ARE :             

ELEPHANT POACHING

An increase in elephant poaching, agricultural pressure along the park periphery, increasing livestock numbers, illegal logging, and intensification of illegal fishing are all factors that threaten the long-term conservation of the area which will be addressed by improving protection and surveillance and by overhauling law enforcement.

ILLEGAL FISHING

Significant commercial fishing activities are observed on the Niger River. Several thousand permanent fishermen are settled and harvest the ecosystem on an almost industrial scale. These activities often go hand in hand with poaching for bush meat and habitat degradation. Illegal fishing activities are also common within Park W in seasonal rivers and ponds.

HUMAN ENCROACHMENT 

As a result of the increased population growth in the surrounding communities bordering the Park W, the demand for natural resources has also increased. This has resulted in an unsustainable demand and added additional pressure on the current land in the area. The boundary of the Controlled Occupational Zone is often not respected by farmers, cattle herders and hunters.

HUMAN-WILDLIFE CONFLICT

Human-Wildlife Conflict is mostly caused by elephant, buffalo, monkeys, warthog and lion and is common along the boundary of the Controlled Occupational Zone. As agriculture and livestock are the region's two main activities, the destruction of crops by wildlife and the potential loss of domestic livestock killed by carnivores could lead to conflict situations between the Park W management and local communities.

NOMADIC HERDERS

Many transhumance Peuhl herders who originate from a variety of different countries in the region have been observed grazing their cattle within the Complex. These herds are a major threat as they compete directly with wildlife for forage and access to water, and the risk of epizootic disease is increased.

SOLUTIONS :

Together with the Government of Niger and other key partners, we are working to ensure the ecological restoration and protection of Park W. This includes the creation of a special brigade to overhaul law enforcement practices and to safeguard the park’s wildlife and build a constituency for conservation with local communities. Protecting the last great savannah in West Africa, and its iconic species, will help preserve this wilderness for generations to come. Wild Africa Conservation’s strategy promotes environmentally-sensitive enterprises to help increase employment and generate needed income for the park as well as for local communities living in the area. Working with local communities is a top priority, to mitigate human-wildlife conflict and provide alternative livelihoods to poaching and natural resource extraction, to ensure a future and prosperity for the region.

MORE INFO: contact@wac-niger.org

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